21/06/2013

A Blackbird Bash

Debuting in 1953, the rare Triumph Blackbird was identical to that year’s Thunderbird model, but featured the all-black paint scheme so badly desired by the U.S. market at the time. This nod to stateside buying preferences was one of the first indications from Triumph of how important the U.S. market was. Fast forward nearly sixty years and the 2012 Triumph Thunderbird Storm carries on that same spirit of blacked-out attitude and power.

On April 13, 2012, the folks from The Selvedge Yard hooked up with PRPS Jeans and Triumph to throw a party inspired by the iconic Blackbird. Held at Fast Ashley’s in Brooklyn, the event drew a who’s who of NYC fashion and motorcycle aficionados. And it was no wonder the party was such a success, with lots of great giveaways, including 13 pairs of super-cool, limited-edition “Blackbird” jeans from PRPS and t-shirts and jackets from Triumph’s official apparel line.

All-new work from renowned photographer Scott Toepfer was also on display, and the star of the show, a vintage 1953 Blackbird, was parked front and center, alongside its spiritual successor, the matte black 2012 Thunderbird Storm.

Not many Blackbirds are still around today, making them hugely collectible and worthy of such an excellent event as the one held by The Selvedge Yard. Thanks to all who attended for helping to celebrate a true Triumph legend.

For more information on the event, visit The Selvedge Yard. To check out the 2012 Triumph Thunderbird Storm, click here.

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